Rectory Lane Cemetery, Berkhamsted

Rectory Lane Cemetery, Berkhamsted

Wildlife in the Cemetery

Because of its secluded location and abundance of trees and grasses, Rectory Lane Cemetery is a haven for wildlife in the middle of Berkhamsted town. Many species of wild birds, mammal and insects can be easily seen. Here are some of the species you may see, depending on the time of year.


Further Reading

Blackbird

Male blackbird

The common blackbird is easily recognised by its striking bright orange-yellow beak and eye-ring. Its varied song is one of the most beautiful birdsongs in British gardens.

Confusingly, female blackbirds are actually brown, often with spots and streaks on their breasts. 

Chaffinch

Male chaffinch 

The male chaffinch is a distinctive pink and grey bird with a blue-grey cap and rust-red underparts and black and white wings. The female has similar markings but is much duller. In spring and early summer, the male chaffinch’s song is one of the most enchanting and easily recognisable birdsongs in Britain, with repeating bursts of rapid twittering.

Blue Tit

Another easily identifiable bird is the blue tit, unmistakable by its bright blue and yellow plumage. The blue tit looks similar to a great tit, but it is smaller and has a blue cap on its head.

Great Tit

Great Tit

With their blue and white plumage, great tits are slightly larger than their cousins, the blue tit, but they can be recognised by the black cap on their heads.

Coal Tit

Coal Tit

Even smaller than blue tits, coal tits are mostly coloured black around the head, with beige lower plumage and blue-grey wings.

Robin

Robin

Robin

Red Kite

Red Kite in flight

This large, magnificent bird of prey can be recognised by its distinctive forked tail, black and white angled wings and red plumage underneath. With a wingspan of nearly 2 metres, this is one of Britain’s largest birds.

Kites were extinct in England but were re-introduced in 1989 the RSPB and the Nature Conservancy Council. You can often spot a red kite hovering high over Rectory Lane Cemetery, probably hunting a tasty field mouse! 

Tawny Owl

Tawny Owl

If you’re around the cemetery at night, you may hear the shrill call of an owl:

Hawfinch

A hawfinch in the Rectory Lane Cemetery yew trees

The hawfinch is Britain’s largest finch. It is a shy bird, and only rarely seen as its numbers have declined in recent years, although they have been spotted recently in Rectory Lane Cemetery. Hawfinches have similar grey-pink plumage to a chaffinch but are much bigger. If you are lucky enough to see one, you can recognise it by its large, powerful bill.