Rectory Lane Cemetery, Berkhamsted

Rectory Lane Cemetery, Berkhamsted

Biography:
Angus Scott Lewis
d. 22/07/1905

Angus Scott Lewis 1860-1905 Angus had a varied and distinguished legal career; he was born in Ireland, grew up in Wales, moved to London and finally to Berkhamsted in the early C20th, where he lived for no more than three years before dying of typhoid fever. Angus was born in 1860 in Garway, Ireland, his parents being the Rev. John Lewis, and Sarah Scott. By 1871 they had moved to Tenby in Wales; his older brother James died there at the age of only 23. Angus had become an articled clerk by the age of 21, serving with Charles Rees Stokes of Tenby.   In 1884 as a clerk he applied for the transfer of the license of the Grey horse Inn there but in the same year ‘obtained first place at the recent competitive examination in London held for the purpose of filling a vacant appointment in the legal department of the Treasury… Mr Lewis’s appointment has given much satisfaction to his friends in Tenby.’ Whilst in the town, he also saved the life of a drowning boy, Alfred Flynn, aged 13, who had jumped into the deep water from The First Point, unable to swim. Lewis ‘brought him to shore in a very distressed state.’ In 1888 he was called to the bar.  He soon became associated with the legal department of the Treasury, and was appointed assistant director of public prosecutions in succession to Lord Desart. Angus was also assistant solicitor to the Treasury. These are just a few examples of the cases Lewis was associated with:
  • In 1890 he appeared as the prosecution in a case of a farmer in Kensal Green being in possession of four cows affected with pleuro-pneumonia
  • In the same year, he appeared in the prosecution of three young men from Kingston who were charged with assaulting a domestic servant and stealing her gold wrist strap watch. Eliza Carey had gone to Kingston to listen to the band on promenade, and after visiting three pubs with the men, was assaulted.
  • In 1892 Lewis took part in ‘The Bickley Outrage’ trial, where two young girls were shot by a fisherman, Leonard Manktlow in Chislehurst’ which received coverage in papers nationally. Lewis ‘said there was nothing in the evidence which would warrant him in suggesting that there was any motive for the crime.’
  • He appeared in 1894 at the trial of Guiseppe Farnara and Francis Polti who were prosecuted for being in possession of explosives (Farnara, an Italian, pleaded guilty and stated that ‘I had the intention to blow up the capitalists, and all the middle classes’)https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?div=t18940430-434
  • In 1896 he was the prosecutor in the case of ‘The Windsor Tragedy’ involving the murder of his wife by a member of the Royal horse Guard.
In 1901, it was reported that Lewis was appointed Assistant director of Public Prosecutions. He married Constance Helen in 1890 in Kingston, Surrey. They had two sons. They were still living in Kingston in 1901, at the Red Lodge – interestingly they ported the name to their house in Berkhamsted – it would appear they only moved to the town in 1902/3. Angus died of typhoid fever on 22nd July 1905 ; he was buried two days later. Obituary   Angus Scott Lewis (1860-1905) DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MR. A, SCOTT LEWIS – The death occurred on Saturday, after a short illness, of Mr Angus Scott Lewis, of Graemsdyke-road. The deceased gentleman, who was well known as the conductor of Treasury prosecutions, was called to the Bar in 1888. He soon became associated with the legal department of the Treasury, and was appointed assistant director of public prosecutions in succession to Lord Desart. Mr Lewis was also assistant solicitor to the Treasury. The deceased gentleman had been resident in Berkhamsted for several tears, and was 45 years of age. The funeral took place very quietly on Monday, the remains being interred in the terrace at the top of the old cemetery. The family and a number of friends, including Mr. W.A Burr followed as mourners. There were no flowers by request, but one wreath from the family was buried with the coffin. The Rev. H.C. Curtis, Rector, officiated at the internment. H.J. Matthews were the undertakers. Watford Observer 29th July 1905
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Angus Scott Lewis 1860-1905

Angus had a varied and distinguished legal career; he was born in Ireland, grew up in Wales, moved to London and finally to Berkhamsted in the early C20th, where he lived for no more than three years before dying of typhoid fever.

Angus was born in 1860 in Garway, Ireland, his parents being the Rev. John Lewis, and Sarah Scott. By 1871 they had moved to Tenby in Wales; his older brother James died there at the age of only 23.

Angus had become an articled clerk by the age of 21, serving with Charles Rees Stokes of Tenby.   In 1884 as a clerk he applied for the transfer of the license of the Grey horse Inn there but in the same year ‘obtained first place at the recent competitive examination in London held for the purpose of filling a vacant appointment in the legal department of the Treasury… Mr Lewis’s appointment has given much satisfaction to his friends in Tenby.

Whilst in the town, he also saved the life of a drowning boy, Alfred Flynn, aged 13, who had jumped into the deep water from The First Point, unable to swim. Lewis ‘brought him to shore in a very distressed state.’

In 1888 he was called to the bar.  He soon became associated with the legal department of the Treasury, and was appointed assistant director of public prosecutions in succession to Lord Desart. Angus was also assistant solicitor to the Treasury.

These are just a few examples of the cases Lewis was associated with:

  • In 1890 he appeared as the prosecution in a case of a farmer in Kensal Green being in possession of four cows affected with pleuro-pneumonia
  • In the same year, he appeared in the prosecution of three young men from Kingston who were charged with assaulting a domestic servant and stealing her gold wrist strap watch. Eliza Carey had gone to Kingston to listen to the band on promenade, and after visiting three pubs with the men, was assaulted.
  • In 1892 Lewis took part in ‘The Bickley Outrage’ trial, where two young girls were shot by a fisherman, Leonard Manktlow in Chislehurst’ which received coverage in papers nationally. Lewis ‘said there was nothing in the evidence which would warrant him in suggesting that there was any motive for the crime.’
  • He appeared in 1894 at the trial of Guiseppe Farnara and Francis Polti who were prosecuted for being in possession of explosives (Farnara, an Italian, pleaded guilty and stated that ‘I had the intention to blow up the capitalists, and all the middle classes’)https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?div=t18940430-434
  • In 1896 he was the prosecutor in the case of ‘The Windsor Tragedy’ involving the murder of his wife by a member of the Royal horse Guard.

In 1901, it was reported that Lewis was appointed Assistant director of Public Prosecutions.

He married Constance Helen in 1890 in Kingston, Surrey. They had two sons. They were still living in Kingston in 1901, at the Red Lodge – interestingly they ported the name to their house in Berkhamsted – it would appear they only moved to the town in 1902/3.

Angus died of typhoid fever on 22nd July 1905 ; he was buried two days later.

Obituary   Angus Scott Lewis (1860-1905)
DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MR. A, SCOTT LEWIS – The death occurred on Saturday, after a short illness, of Mr Angus Scott Lewis, of Graemsdyke-road. The deceased gentleman, who was well known as the conductor of Treasury prosecutions, was called to the Bar in 1888. He soon became associated with the legal department of the Treasury, and was appointed assistant director of public prosecutions in succession to Lord Desart. Mr Lewis was also assistant solicitor to the Treasury. The deceased gentleman had been resident in Berkhamsted for several tears, and was 45 years of age. The funeral took place very quietly on Monday, the remains being interred in the terrace at the top of the old cemetery. The family and a number of friends, including Mr. W.A Burr followed as mourners. There were no flowers by request, but one wreath from the family was buried with the coffin. The Rev. H.C. Curtis, Rector, officiated at the internment. H.J. Matthews were the undertakers.

Watford Observer 29th July 1905

Relatives