Charles Brown | Rectory Lane Cemetery, Berkhamsted

Rectory Lane Cemetery, Berkhamsted

Biography:
Charles Brown
17/04/2024 –22/10/1928

Plot 1010 Charles Brown

Charles was born 1857/8, Speldhurst, Kent, son of Jonathan Brown, publican of the Langton New Inn and Frances, his wife. He was baptised privately and the baptism recorded on 25 January 1858 in the registers of St Paul’s, Rusthall. Langton Green, is part of the parish of Speldhurst, and lies west of Tunbridge Wells. Rusthall is half way between them.

The inn closed in the 1930s (http://www.dover-kent.com/2014-project/New-Inn-Langton-Green.html)

Very shortly after Charles’s birth Jonathan moved to the Red Lion, Lower Green, a hamlet to the west of Tunbridge Wells and south of Speldhurst, where he is recorded in the 1861 census. The pub is still in operation. Both Jonathan and his wife Frances were born in Sussex, as were their five oldest children. Their sixth child was born in 1853 in Speldhurst parish, as were the rest of the eight children, of whom Charles was the seventh.

In 1871 the family were living at Upper Ashton Lodge, Eynsford, Kent. Jonathan was “Farm bailiff and principal manager of 512 acres (employing 12 men & 6 boys)”. Only three of the children were at home. The eldest son was a groom and Charles and his sister were scholars.

Charles married Louisa George August 30 1884 at St Peter’s, Stepney. He gave his occupation as coachman.

The couple were to have four daughters and another child who had died by 1901: Louie (b1887 Stamford Hill, London), Florrie Frances (b 1889 Sandgate, Kent), Mildred (b 1892 Newmarket), Laura Kate (b. 1895 Newmarket).

By the time of the 1891 census Charles and Louisa had moved to Newmarket and Charles was a “racing stableman”. The couple lived on Old Station Road (now the B1063). As well as Louie and Florrie there were also two young male lodgers.

By the time of the 1901 census they were living in the High Street, Newmarket and Charles had taken up his father’s occupation – he was a public house proprietor.

In 1911 he was recorded as “Agent for Midland Railway Co. and Publican”, High Street, Kimbolton, Huntingdonshire. The pub is not named but there were two possibilities – the George Hotel or the White Lion. Given that Charles is described as “publican” rather than hotel keeper, the White Lion is more likely [Image: https://www.closedpubs.co.uk/huntingdonshire/kimbolton_whitelion.html ]

Daughter Louie was married and was “assisting in the business” and had her two small children living with her, although her husband does not appear on the return. Florrie was a school teacher, Millie (Mildred) was a teacher of music and sixteen year-old Laura was also assisting in the business.

By the time of the June 1921 census Charles had taken over the Midland Hotel opposite the Midland railway station in Hemel Hempstead. The station has long since been closed but the Midland Hotel remains a pub, located at the junction of Midland Road, Adeyfield Road and Lower Adeyfield Road. 

It was a full household. As well as Charles and Louisa, who was described as “assistant” to her husband, there was unmarried daughter Florrie, working as a book keeper; Laura, now married, and her daughter; Louie, her husband who worked for John Dickinson’s the paper manufacturer and their daughter and two more grandchildren.

By 1926 Charles, Louisa and Florrie were living in Berkhamsted at the Lamb pub, which is still operating on the corner of Boxwell Road.

Charles died 22 October 1928 aged 70. Louisa survived him until 1937 and is buried with him here.

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in the cemetery

Plot 1010 Charles Brown

Charles was born 1857/8, Speldhurst, Kent, son of Jonathan Brown, publican of the Langton New Inn and Frances, his wife. He was baptised privately and the baptism recorded on 25 January 1858 in the registers of St Paul’s, Rusthall. Langton Green, is part of the parish of Speldhurst, and lies west of Tunbridge Wells. Rusthall is half way between them.

The inn closed in the 1930s (http://www.dover-kent.com/2014-project/New-Inn-Langton-Green.html)

Very shortly after Charles’s birth Jonathan moved to the Red Lion, Lower Green, a hamlet to the west of Tunbridge Wells and south of Speldhurst, where he is recorded in the 1861 census. The pub is still in operation. Both Jonathan and his wife Frances were born in Sussex, as were their five oldest children. Their sixth child was born in 1853 in Speldhurst parish, as were the rest of the eight children, of whom Charles was the seventh.

In 1871 the family were living at Upper Ashton Lodge, Eynsford, Kent. Jonathan was “Farm bailiff and principal manager of 512 acres (employing 12 men & 6 boys)”. Only three of the children were at home. The eldest son was a groom and Charles and his sister were scholars.

Charles married Louisa George August 30 1884 at St Peter’s, Stepney. He gave his occupation as coachman.

The couple were to have four daughters and another child who had died by 1901: Louie (b1887 Stamford Hill, London), Florrie Frances (b 1889 Sandgate, Kent), Mildred (b 1892 Newmarket), Laura Kate (b. 1895 Newmarket).

By the time of the 1891 census Charles and Louisa had moved to Newmarket and Charles was a “racing stableman”. The couple lived on Old Station Road (now the B1063). As well as Louie and Florrie there were also two young male lodgers.

By the time of the 1901 census they were living in the High Street, Newmarket and Charles had taken up his father’s occupation – he was a public house proprietor.

In 1911 he was recorded as “Agent for Midland Railway Co. and Publican”, High Street, Kimbolton, Huntingdonshire. The pub is not named but there were two possibilities – the George Hotel or the White Lion. Given that Charles is described as “publican” rather than hotel keeper, the White Lion is more likely [Image: https://www.closedpubs.co.uk/huntingdonshire/kimbolton_whitelion.html ]

Daughter Louie was married and was “assisting in the business” and had her two small children living with her, although her husband does not appear on the return. Florrie was a school teacher, Millie (Mildred) was a teacher of music and sixteen year-old Laura was also assisting in the business.

By the time of the June 1921 census Charles had taken over the Midland Hotel opposite the Midland railway station in Hemel Hempstead. The station has long since been closed but the Midland Hotel remains a pub, located at the junction of Midland Road, Adeyfield Road and Lower Adeyfield Road. 

It was a full household. As well as Charles and Louisa, who was described as “assistant” to her husband, there was unmarried daughter Florrie, working as a book keeper; Laura, now married, and her daughter; Louie, her husband who worked for John Dickinson’s the paper manufacturer and their daughter and two more grandchildren.

By 1926 Charles, Louisa and Florrie were living in Berkhamsted at the Lamb pub, which is still operating on the corner of Boxwell Road.

Charles died 22 October 1928 aged 70. Louisa survived him until 1937 and is buried with him here.

Relatives