Charles Eggleton | Rectory Lane Cemetery, Berkhamsted

Rectory Lane Cemetery, Berkhamsted

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Biography:
Charles Eggleton
1888 –1936

Unmarked grave Charles Eggleton (1888-1936)

Charles was born in 1888 in Hawridge, Bucks the son of Harry Eggleton, a cowman/shepherd, and Sarah (née Harnott) (His mother also lies in this cemetery).

Charles married Gladys G Hoddy, born in Suffolk, in Berkhamsted in 1914 and their son Robert Charles was born the next year.

In 1921 the family were living at 5, Gossoms End and Charles was employed as an agricultural labourer.

The family moved to 47, Cross Oak Road but Charles was killed by a train on the LMS mainline on November 7th 1936 when he was 48.

The Bucks Examiner reported the inquest in detail. “…[He] fell into the side of a passing train. He was a general labourer employed by Messrs W. Key & Sons, served with the 2nd Battalion Northants Regt. during the war, and saw considerable service in France, was married and leaves a widow and a married son.”

His son Robert identified his father and said he had good health, eyesight and hearing. “He enjoyed going out after rabbits.” Charles had gone rabbiting with David Allan Mapley of Northchurch and they had collected a ferret from a Mr Janes who had “rabbiting rights” on the embankment. (On questioning, Janes admitted they were trespassing.) They were checking out the rabbit holes when Mapley heard a noise and saw Eggleston being carried along by the train. He was dead when he reached him. Police agreed that he appeared to have slipped. 

Charles was buried 12 November 1936.

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in the cemetery

Unmarked grave Charles Eggleton (1888-1936)

Charles was born in 1888 in Hawridge, Bucks the son of Harry Eggleton, a cowman/shepherd, and Sarah (née Harnott) (His mother also lies in this cemetery).

Charles married Gladys G Hoddy, born in Suffolk, in Berkhamsted in 1914 and their son Robert Charles was born the next year.

In 1921 the family were living at 5, Gossoms End and Charles was employed as an agricultural labourer.

The family moved to 47, Cross Oak Road but Charles was killed by a train on the LMS mainline on November 7th 1936 when he was 48.

The Bucks Examiner reported the inquest in detail. “…[He] fell into the side of a passing train. He was a general labourer employed by Messrs W. Key & Sons, served with the 2nd Battalion Northants Regt. during the war, and saw considerable service in France, was married and leaves a widow and a married son.”

His son Robert identified his father and said he had good health, eyesight and hearing. “He enjoyed going out after rabbits.” Charles had gone rabbiting with David Allan Mapley of Northchurch and they had collected a ferret from a Mr Janes who had “rabbiting rights” on the embankment. (On questioning, Janes admitted they were trespassing.) They were checking out the rabbit holes when Mapley heard a noise and saw Eggleston being carried along by the train. He was dead when he reached him. Police agreed that he appeared to have slipped. 

Charles was buried 12 November 1936.

Relatives